For years, I had been experimenting with social media as a tool for telling stories, refining ideas of character-based social and multi-threaded conversation story across multiple platforms. When I was hired onto The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, I was given the opportunity to combine all of these experiments into one, large scale project. The result far exceed any hopes I could have imagined.  Over the course of one calendar year, we told a modernized version of Austen’s story, primarily through fictional YouTube vlogs. All of the characters had social media accounts, and in between the episodes they would talk to each other -- and the audience. As the show progressed, we kept adding new social and immersive layers, until the show spanned five different YouTube channels, and thirty-five social media profiles over a dozen platforms kept. The transmedia plan created the sense that the story was unfolding in real time, creating a web that drew in audiences and kept them immersed in the story. In the process, The Lizzie Bennet Diaries became a sensation, pulling in tens of millions of viewers, winning awards, and creating a whole new format for multiplatform storytelling.  The transmedia content of show won a Primetime Emmy Award, for Outstanding Creative Achievement in Interactive Media, Original Interactive Program. The show also won multiple Streamy Awards, and was nominated for a Producers Guild Award. The show has been the subject of thesis papers, cited in academic works about interactive media, and continues to have an active audience well past its initial run.

The Lizzie Bennet Diaries

Transmedia Producer, Writer

#Adaptation, #Digital Series, #Interactive, #Multiplatform, #Social, #Transmedia

Producer: Pemberley Digital
Emmy Winner: Outstanding Creative Achievement in Interactive Media, Original Interactive Program
PGA Award Nominee: Best Interactive Series
Streamy Award Winner: Best Drama Series, Best Interactive Series
IAWTV Award Winner: Best Interactive Experience

For years, I had been experimenting with social media as a tool for telling stories, refining ideas of character-based social and multi-threaded conversation story across multiple platforms. When I was hired onto The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, I was given the opportunity to combine all of these experiments into one, large scale project. The result far exceed any hopes I could have imagined.

Over the course of one calendar year, we told a modernized version of Austen’s story, primarily through fictional YouTube vlogs. All of the characters had social media accounts, and in between the episodes they would talk to each other -- and the audience. As the show progressed, we kept adding new social and immersive layers, until the show spanned five different YouTube channels, and thirty-five social media profiles over a dozen platforms kept.

The transmedia plan created the sense that the story was unfolding in real time, creating a web that drew in audiences and kept them immersed in the story. In the process, The Lizzie Bennet Diaries became a sensation, pulling in tens of millions of viewers, winning awards, and creating a whole new format for multiplatform storytelling.

The show became the first Youtube-distributed series to win a Primetime Emmy award. It’s been the subject of thesis papers, cited in academic works about interactive media, and continues to have an active audience well past its initial run.

Pemberley Digital: See all of “Lizzie Bennet Diaries.”
The Guardian: “Pure Genius”
GigaOm: The Lizzie Bennet Diaries might be one of the most important web content stories of 2012
Buzzfeed: YouTube’s Hidden Masterpiece Theater
AVClub: The quintessentially 21st-century take on Austen’s novel
Hypable: “The Lizzie Bennet Diaries” wins Interactive Media Emmy